Workers Held Hostage by Employee Contracts: An Issue of Standing?

Author: Brynn Stylinski, Associate Member University of Cincinnati Law Review

On April 8, 2015, the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois dismissed a class action suit against the restaurant chain Jimmy John’s for lack of standing.[1] The complaint involved a requirement that all employees sign an unduly-restrictive Confidentiality and Non-Competition Agreements.[2] The plaintiffs, current and former Jimmy John’s employees, sought declaratory and injunctive relief from the terms of the restrictive agreements.[3] However, the court held that the plaintiffs lacked standing to bring suit based on an apparent lack of injury and deficiencies in the plaintiffs’ pleading.[4] Continue reading “Workers Held Hostage by Employee Contracts: An Issue of Standing?”

Part II: JobsOhio- Why the Ohio Supreme Court Should Not Abandon the Sheward Public-Right Exception

Author: Cameron Downer, Associate Member, University of Cincinnati Law Review

On November 6, the Supreme Court of Ohio heard oral arguments in the case of ProgressOhio.org, Inc. v. JobsOhio.[1] With this case, the Supreme Court of Ohio has the opportunity to reinforce or abandon the public right exception to standing. Although some people think the public-right exception should be abandoned, the exception acts as a safeguard for Ohioans. Without the public right exception, legislative acts that fundamentally alter the structure of the state government could go unchallenged; such is the case with JobsOhio.

Continue reading “Part II: JobsOhio- Why the Ohio Supreme Court Should Not Abandon the Sheward Public-Right Exception”