Concerted Activity in Social Media: The Future of Labor Activity

Author: Brynn Stylinski, Contributing Member, University of Cincinnati Law Review

In today’s world of social media, employee interactions regarding their employers are becoming increasingly more public. Conversations that previously would have taken place in a private home or around the water cooler now take place online and may take many different shapes. Instead of a simple exchange of words, an interaction regarding one’s employer might include a re-tweet, a “like,” or a share. This poses a problem for those who must evaluate whether such activity is protected under the terms of the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) Continue reading “Concerted Activity in Social Media: The Future of Labor Activity”

To Pay or Not to Pay: Should Interns be Considered Employees under the Fair Labor Standards Act

Author: Brynn Stylinski Contributing Member University of Cincinnati Law Review

The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) requires employers to pay every employee a minimum wage and to pay overtime for any hours worked over forty hours per week. However, whether a worker qualifies as an employee has been debated for years.[1]  Earlier this year, the Second Circuit reversed a New York district court’s finding that a group of unpaid interns were employees under the FLSA and thus entitled to minimum wage and overtime payments (employee wages).[2]   Continue reading “To Pay or Not to Pay: Should Interns be Considered Employees under the Fair Labor Standards Act”