Ohio’s Limits on Health Services in the Electronic Age

Author: Andrea Flaute, Associate Member, University of Cincinnati Law Review

Telemedicine is a key innovation in the health care industry. Sharing patient information and physician services across long distances bridges a gap for patients across the world. Telemedicine’s benefits include access to services that would otherwise be unavailable; streamlined and efficient communication between patients and physicians; and the ever-important reduction of health care costs. The recent launch of “mHealth,” Continue reading “Ohio’s Limits on Health Services in the Electronic Age”

The Seventh Circuit Revisits Standing for Data Breach Class Actions

By Zachariah DeMeola, Guest Editor, BakerHostetler
Link to original post: http://bit.ly/1pOpf9K 

 

One obstacle for named plaintiffs in proposed data breach class actions is the extent to which plaintiffs must allege an injury-in-fact to have standing. Disputes often arise about whether proactive efforts to mitigate against the potential misuse of stolen data, such as utilizing credit monitoring services, are sufficient to confer Article III standing. Since the U.S. Supreme Court issued its decision in Clapper v. Amnesty International USA, Continue reading “The Seventh Circuit Revisits Standing for Data Breach Class Actions”

THE DOUBLE EDGED SWORD: ELECTRONIC HEALTH RECORDS AND DATA BREACHES

Author: Andrea Flaute, Associate Member, University of Cincinnati Law Review

The conflict between technology and privacy does not stop at the hospital door. The emergence of a technology driven society has created a desire and push to incorporate all parts of life into electronic format, including personal health records (PHR). Although the enactment of the Health Insurance and Portability Accountability Act[1] pre-dates the technology boom,[2] the privacy protections it contains compliment the electronic records provisions included in the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act.[3] Continue reading “THE DOUBLE EDGED SWORD: ELECTRONIC HEALTH RECORDS AND DATA BREACHES”

The FTC and Cybersecurity: Unfair Business Practices or Unfair Business Expectations

Author: Brooke Logsdon, Associate Member, University of Cincinnati Law Review

National Cybersecurity, or the lack thereof, has frequently been front and center in our national news these days. Despite the recent increase of cyber-attacks on corporate entities such as Target, Ashley Madison, and Anthem,[1] Congress has yet to pass an adequate cybersecurity bill that would protect our government, our infrastructure, and our private sector from cybersecurity attacks.[2] When Wyndham Hotels fell victim to cyber-attacks in 2008, it decided to fight the Federal Trade Commission’s (FTC) authority to declare business practices “unfair.” Continue reading “The FTC and Cybersecurity: Unfair Business Practices or Unfair Business Expectations”

Phone Frustration: FTC Files Suit against AT&T for Deliberately Slowing Phone Speeds of “Unlimited” Plan Users

Author: Ashley Clever, Contributing Member, University of Cincinnati Law Review

Frustration with technology often causes one to wonder if there is an electronic conspiracy raging war against technology users. Usually these thoughts are ridiculous, fabricated only by an overly-unreliable copy machine that seems to always jam minutes before an important deadline or by an iPhone that works perfectly until the day the newest version is released and then mysteriously begins to freeze, making the owner want to upgrade. But some worries about an elaborate electronic conspiracy might actually be well-founded, and the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) recently filed a complaint against AT&T Mobility Company (AT&T) for reducing the data speeds of users who had an “unlimited” phone plan.[1]

Continue reading “Phone Frustration: FTC Files Suit against AT&T for Deliberately Slowing Phone Speeds of “Unlimited” Plan Users”