Tattoo Rights Inked Into The Constitution: Why Tattoos Are Protected Speech Under the First Amendment

Author: Jordie Bacon, Associate Member, University of Cincinnati Law Review Tattoos often portray significant moments in a person’s life, mark rites of passage, show religious devotion, or express feelings towards others. Getting a tattoo allows someone to make “permanent that which is fleeting.”[1] Tattoos, which at one point were seen as a seedy tradition of... Continue Reading →

When is it legal for an employer to discriminate in their hiring practices based on a Bona Fide Occupation Qualification?

Author: Stephanie Scott, Associate Member, University of Cincinnati Law Review Although it is illegal for an employer to discriminate against an employee based on the individual’s sex, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 allows employers an exception when employment discrimination is based on a "bona fide occupational qualification” (BFOQ). Courts have upheld... Continue Reading →

Should States Preempt Local Governments from Passing Higher Minimum Wage Ordinances?

Author: Stephanie Scott, Associate Member, University of Cincinnati Law Review  While the federal government sets a minimum wage that is the nationwide “floor,” many state legislatures have passed their own laws requiring a minimum wage above the federal minimum. Recently, individual cities and localities have further tried to account for inflation and higher-cost living expenses... Continue Reading →

Look Policies: Can employers discriminate based on their physical attractiveness?

Author: Stephanie Scott, Associate Member, University of Cincinnati Law Review Companies with mandatory grooming or appearance standards for their employees have been under fire from society, celebrities, and the law for many years. One of the companies most known for discriminating against unattractive or overweight applicants is Abercrombie & Fitch. Consumers have been outraged that... Continue Reading →

Brady Evidence Suppression Claims: Should Courts Require Criminal Defendants to Exercise Due Diligence during Discovery?  

Author: Maxel Moreland, Associate Member, University of Cincinnati Law Review When a criminal defendant enters a court room, the court controls the future of that defendant’s liberty. With so much at stake, criminal trial procedures should not require criminal defendants to exert additional effort in procuring beneficial evidence when the prosecutor has already discovered such... Continue Reading →

Up ↑

Skip to content